ESG News & Events

Posted in Group Updates

ESG Business Meeting 6/12/21 @ 10:45am

Our monthly business meeting will be next Saturday after the regular meeting.

Early Sobriety Group Trusted Servants

(As of 6/5/2021)

GROUP STEERING COMMITTEE REPRESENTATIVES

  • Chairperson: NONE AT PRESENT
    • Secretary: NONE AT PRESENT
    • Treasurer: Christopher G. (term ends in Dec 2022)
    • Phone/Reading List/Steering Committee Chair: Dustin S. (term ends when he is deployed)
    • Webmaster – Christopher G.
    • Group Members: Joel D., Perry S., Christopher G., Dustin S., Tania M., Jodi S., Clarence S., LA, Mary, Georgiana A.

DISTRICT & AREA COMMITTEE REPRESENTATIVES

  • General Service Representative: Perry S. (term ends in Dec 2022)
    • Alternate General Service Representative: NONE AT PRESENT

INTERGROUP COMMITTEE REPRESENTATIVES

  • Intergroup Representative: Joel D. (term ends in Dec 2022)
    • Alternate Intergroup Representative: NONE AT PRESENT

DISTRICT & INTERGROUP COMMITTEE REPRESENTATIVES

  • Archives Representative: NONE AT PRESENT – First meeting was 5/9/20
    • Corrections Representative: NONE AT PRESENT
    • C.P.C./P.I. Representative: NONE AT PRESENT
    • Grapevine/La Vina Representative: NONE AT PRESENT
    • Literature Representative: NONE AT PRESENT
    • Treatment Representative: NONE AT PRESENT

MISC. GROUP POSITIONS

  • Greeter: Georgiana A.
    • Dictionary Steward: NONE AT PRESENT

Posted in Sharing

Compound Interest

Financial people tell us that to have your savings grow
Letting interest compound is the better way to go
By keeping funds invested will increase total return
And add to your investment by the money that you earn

Recovery from booze and drugs is not an easy task
But neither was the life we lived in our addicted past
Mired in our misery from alcohol or dope
We found a room with folks like us to finally give us hope

They told us of their struggles, stories where we could relate
Of how they reached their bottom, feeling lost and desolate
But somehow, they had managed to recover from despair
And learned just how to live again, an answer to their prayer

To reach their goal, sobriety, required certain steps
A list of things they’d need to do to regain self-respect
Admit defeat, commit to do whatever it would take
And join the AA fellowship, its practices partake

When we arrived, we were confused, unsure of what to do
But as we kept on coming back, we started to accrue
The answers to the task at hand, a proper way to live
Not just release from alcohol, to get we had to give

This lesson was not one we alcoholics understood
Our lives been lived, consumed with self, not for a common good
Yet, we were told we had to change, assist our fellow man
Through service work and sponsorship, that’s how AA began

For some of us it took a while to fully comprehend
The effort we would have to make to help ourselves to mend
We thought a meeting twice a week should surely keep us straight
Then wondered why it did not work, old ways reactivate

We’d heard the words but did not act, results had been the same
Back at the bottle once again, with just ourselves to blame
We’d try again, but this time we would do what they suggest
And change our lives by all the time and effort we’d invest

We’d make a meeting every day and call some AA friend
Do service work, be ready with a helping hand to lend
And as we did, we realize we had found the best solution
To battle our addiction and remove our destitution

To work the program properly we needed to invest
By doing what’s suggested, be a member, not a guest
The more we are committed to our AA way of living
We add another chapter to the gift that we’ve been given

We put away some money, get the interest, let it grow
Sobriety’s the same, more we invest the more we sew
We compound our investment every day that we commit
To do the next right thing, day by day and bit by bit

Larry R.

Posted in Sharing

What Humility Means To Me

In the opening paragraphs of the chapter devoted to step seven in The Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions, Bill Wilson emphatically states, “the attainment of greater humility is the foundation principle of each of AA’s twelve steps.” The legendary alcoholic goes on to claim that, “…without some degree of humility, no alcoholic can stay sober at all.”  This can be a daunting task in modern day culture, where humility is often associated with weakness, or an almost passive mode of existence.  Society puts so much emphasis on external accomplishments, appearance, and arrogance that even a small display of humility can make one feel like a drowning man coming up for air.  Like many alcoholics, I struggled to define this quiet virtue.  How can I begin to live by these principles if I can’t interpret them myself?  At the suggestion of Bill W. and my sponsor, I set out to find my own meaning.

All too often, alcoholics set out to seek humility by thinking less about themselves when in reality they should be thinking about themselves less.  By following these guidelines, I have determined that humility means that you are secure enough not to need to be reassured by others.  It means that you don’t feel you have to prove yourself by showing that you are more cleaver, smarter, more gifted or more successful than others.  You are secure because you live in God’s love. For he has faith in you even if you do not.  You do not need to compare yourself to others.  You have your task, they have theirs, and that leads you to co-operate, not compete.

This means you can see other people and value them for what they are.  They are not just a series of mirrors at which you look only to see your own reflection.  Secure in yourself, you can see value in others.  Confident in your identity, you can value the people not like you.  Humility is the self turned outward. It is the understanding that it is not about you.

If you set yourself on human approval, you’re controlled by the people you want to please.  I was a walking example of this and this is why I drank.  You become overly concerned with what people think of you and begin to shape your behavior around gaining their approval.  The result is that you lose your sense of who you really are and you start compromising your principles.

So I challenge you, free yourself of the stronghold of society and find your own definition of humility.  Let’s walk this road together!

Stephan B.

Posted in Sharing

What’s Inside MUST Come Out

What comes out when you squeeze an Orange? Orange juice of course, and why’s that? Because that’s what’s inside the Orange.

When we act out in anger and rage and frustration during the course of the day – the reason we behave that way is because that’s what’s inside us.

If we meet a person who is at peace and calm accepting things as they are regardless of what happens it’s because that’s what’s inside them.

So the question becomes how do we get good stuff inside? The answer is we put it there.

And how do we put it there? We read spiritual material, pray, meditate, go to meetings, meet with our sponsor or sponsees, and put good data in our minds so that when something happens we respond in a positive way.

We do not listen to negative things, be around overly negative people, read or watch violence, good data in, good data out. bad data in, bad data out.

Clardy S.

Posted in Sharing

12 Steps In Reverse – Road to Relapse

12= Having detached ourselves spiritually as a result of ignoring these Steps, we let our fellow alcoholics fend for themselves and practiced these principles sporadically.
11= Let our conscious contact with G-d as we understood Him lapse by praying only in emergencies for our will to be carried out.
10= Slacked off on personal inventory and when we were wrong, denied or hid it.
9= Reasoned that no one had been hurt by us more than we had been hurt by them and called it even.
8= Made a game of rationalizing the harm we had done others.
7= Sang “I’ve Gotta Be Me”.
6= Decided that our defects of character were too much fun to give up.
5= Denied to ourselves, to G-d and to everybody else that we had ever done anything harmful.
4= Quickly cast a weak flashlight over our moral inventory and decided it was more fun to take yours.
3= Made a decision to keep our will and our lives totally in our own control.
2= Came to believe that since our troubles were of our own making, we would have to solve them without outside help.
1= We decided that we could control alcohol, that our lives were manageable after all.


Anonymous

Posted in Sharing

HOPE

HOPE is the laughter where once there was none, reposes the gloom of the glowering glum…

HOPE is the newcomer succumbed to submission, who’s journey is launched with an honest admission…

HOPE is the promises we read in our book, good will for the painstaking measures we took…

HOPE is the rooms where we humbly share, hands held as one as we close with a prayer…

HOPE is the big book covered in blue, it’s primary purpose still tried and true…

HOPE is a power far greater than me, wiser and stronger than I’ll ever be…

HOPE is the new life we’ve all come to find, 12 simple steps, one day at a time.

Gordon R.

Posted in Sharing

The deal that God makes with us Alcoholics/Addicts

A drunk is walking home, feeling sick and hurt. He is at that magic moment of surrender.

On his way he sees God and notices He has something in his hand. The drunk asks “What’s that?” God responds “This is sobriety”. The drunk said “Oh man, I need that! Geez, I need sobriety. How much does that cost?” as he only understands buying things. God returns with “How much do you have?” The drunk says “I have about 20 dollars.” God responds “All right, for you, sobriety costs 20 dollars.” The man, trying to back out of says, “If I give you all twenty dollars, I won’t be able to buy any gas for my car.”

God responds “Oh! so you have a car? I’m sorry, but sobriety is going to cost you your car.”
“Whoa, whoa!” Says the man. “If I give you my car, how am I going to get to my job?”

“You have a job?!” Exclaims God. “No, no, no. Sobriety is going to cost you your job.”
The drunk responds “But, if I give you my job, how am I to pay for my house?” House!!

You have a house!?” God says with surprise. “I thought you lived in a cardboard box under the bridge! Your file is completely out of date! Sobriety is going to cost you your house.”

The man responds “If I give you my house what about my wife and kids?”

“A family! That’s right, you have a family! Yes, yes. Sobriety is going to cost you your family.

The drunk responds “But if I give you all that, what good is my life?”

God states “That’s right. Sobriety costs you your life.”

The alcoholic, because he is at that magic moment of surrender is willing to give his God his money, and his car, and his job, and his house, and his wife and his kids, and his life and for that God gives him sobriety.

Then God looks him deep in the eyes and says:

“All right. I’m going to give you your money back but, it’s not your money anymore, it’s my money. I’m going to let you spend it for me.”

“I’m going to give your car back but, it’s not your car anymore, it’s my car. You get to drive it for me.”

“I’m going to give you your job back but, it’s not your job anymore, it’s my job. You get to work at it for me.”

“I give your house back but, it’s not your house anymore, it’s my home. But, you get to live in it for me.”

“I give your family back to you but, it’s not your family anymore, it’s my family. You get to take care of them for me.”

“I give your life back but, it’s not your life ever again. But, you get to live it for me.”

That’s the deal a loving God makes with us in the 3rd step.

Pham C.